Category Archives: Revolution

Krost Chapel Sermon

Here is the sermon I gave in chapel for the Krost Symposium on Environmental Justice.

Cultivating Economic Peace in an Age of Instability

This story is similar to my own journey in understand the relationship of economics to the purpose and mission of the church.

CommonWealthWe tried to imagine an economy informed by the narratives of scripture, one bearing witness to the reign of God. It would be made of the same ingredients as the dominant economy: the same money, jobs, buying and selling goods and services. We weren’t going to try to roll back to a subsistence economy, or a household economy, or barter, or self-reliance. What was needed, we thought, was an economy not based on the goals, values and practices of this age, but one based in the life and teachings of Jesus, as revealed through scripture and the life of Christian communities through the ages.

An economy driven by such a direction seemed to be one in which all are taken care of; none acquire wealth at the expense of the others; all have what they need to live on; excessive consumption is not valued but a shared communal life is; mutual dependence is pursued; true costs are measured; all are called on to participate; we avoid categories that place some in the role of service provider and others in the role of service recipient (volunteer, minister/ministry, needy…). We assume we have all we need to take care of each other as brothers and sisters, fellow members of Christ, the living expression of the grace and provision of God.

via Cultivating Economic Peace in an Age of Instability.

Welcome to Commonomics

This is a really great and in-depth article on some ideas for a new economics and stronger local economies.

Commonomics will focus on the gatherers, those who are working to foster economic growth from within. We’ll be asking what’s working, what isn’t, and by what standard are our local economies to be judged?

“The goal is having community-led, community-controlled economies where the decision-making is by those who are feeling the effects of the decisions that are made. [We need] humanly scaled systems both in economics and politics.”

“You need to think regionally. What does your region support ecologically and where are the markets? The hyper-local focus, within five or 100 miles is foolish. Most goods travel 2,000 miles. If you can build something [to substitute] within 500 miles you’ve made a major impact.”

Here’s an infographic on How Local Dollars Stay Put.

And another on how local businesses strengthen local economies.

via Welcome to Commonomics: How to Build Local Economies Strong Enough for Everyone by Laura Flanders — YES! Magazine.

Cropmobster: Connecting the Dots Between Farms, Food Waste and Hunger

A new food gleaning and supply-sharing program called Cropmobster has created simple and effective solutions to address food waste and hunger and increase farmer visibility in a decentralized, community-based way. And it’s spreading like wildfire.

http://www.shareable.net/blog/cropmobster-connecting-the-dots-between-farms-food-waste-and-hunger

A Decade after the Take: Inside Argentinas Worker Owned Factories

In Argentina, worker ownership requires trust against all odds. As a student of economics and a young activist, I have held the worker-ownership model in Argentina up as a beacon I could orient towards, an alternative and a method of resistance that might be widely applicable.

via A Decade after the Take: Inside Argentinas Worker Owned Factories – Shareable.