Category Archives: Farm

Growing Strength to Grow Food

0-1-0-rice_sacks-573x429“Instead of foreigners sending us food, they should give us the chance to do our own agriculture so it can survive.” So said Rony Charles, a rice grower and member of the Agricultural Producer Cooperative of Verrettes, in Haiti.Giving domestic agriculture the chance to survive would address four critical needs:

1. Creating employment for the majority, estimated at 60% to 80% of the population;[1]
2. Allowing rural people to stay on their land. This is both their right as well as a way to keep Port-au-Prince from becoming even more perilously overcrowded;Addressing an ongoing food crisis. Today, even with imports, more than 2.4 million people out of a population of 9 million are estimated to be food-insecure.
3. Acute malnutrition among children under the age 5 is 9%, and chronic under-nutrition for that age group is 24%.[2] Peasant groups are convinced that, with the necessary investment, Haiti could  produce at least 80% of its food consumption needs; and
4. Promoting a post-earthquake redevelopment plan that serves the needs of the majority, unlike the one currently promoted by the U.S. and U.N. which is based on the growth of sweatshops. See “Poverty-Wage Assembly Plants as Development Strategy in Haiti”.

via Growing Strength to Grow Food: Haitian Farmers Win US Food Soveriegnty Prize.

Some Questions for Your Farmer at the Farmers’ Market

questions-to-ask-your-farmer-at-the-farmers-marketWe are the most divorced from ecology and agriculture civilization in history resulting in a cultural ignorance when it comes to food. As was recently said by Joel Salatin, “we know more about the Kardashians than we do about what we eat.”

As I stood there today in the presence of farmers, pseudo-farmers, and food shysters I began to ponder what initial questions we asked while perusing produce and what might be helpful to others. Here is what I came up with:

via Some Questions for Your Farmer at the Farmers’ Market.

Market Offers Wealth of Tradition—and Veggies—for Immigrant Farmers

Markets like Crossroads support immigrant farmers by connecting them with other immigrants, making it easy to exchange knowledge, and helping them find a way to return to their agrarian roots.

The Crossroads farmers’ market is known statewide for being the first farmers market in Maryland to electronically accept various types of nutrition benefit programs: food stamps, known federally as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); as well as senior food assistance vouchers. Dudley explains that the market committed to accept electronic food stamps after paper vouchers disappeared in the late 1990s.

Although there is a growing population of Latino and Hispanic farmers in the United States, they often struggle with linguistic, cultural, and legal barriers. According to the Agricultural Census of 2007, Hispanic farmers are the fastest-growing population of new farmers and grew 14 percent from 2002, as compared with a 7 percent overall increase in farm operators.

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via Market Offers Wealth of Tradition—and Veggies—for Immigrant Farmers and Shoppers by Sarah Meade and Laura-Anne Minkoff-Zern — YES! Magazine.

Global food waste explained with five tomatoes

Each year, the world produces about 1,471 pounds 670 kilograms of edible food for every person on the planet. We only eat about half of that. What happens to the rest? This video breaks it down — and gives you a few suggestions for what you can do to fix the problem.

via Global food waste explained with five tomatoes | Grist.

Cropmobster: Connecting the Dots Between Farms, Food Waste and Hunger

A new food gleaning and supply-sharing program called Cropmobster has created simple and effective solutions to address food waste and hunger and increase farmer visibility in a decentralized, community-based way. And it’s spreading like wildfire.

http://www.shareable.net/blog/cropmobster-connecting-the-dots-between-farms-food-waste-and-hunger